ladysnowblood:

OUT

(via mudwerks)

grofjardanhazy:

r3druger:

I remember quite a few different designs from different countries.Although it seems pretty silly now, it’s pretty cool to see just how far personal protection, body armor, and armor vehicles have come since the First World War.The thought of rolling forward blindly Into machine gunfire is pretty is pretty horrifying.

Oh, French mobile personnel shields from WWI! Love this!

Similar ones were used by the Russians (here’s an example captured by some Germans):

And the Detroit police had similar mobile armors against riot crowds and barricaded gunmen in the late 1950s:

But snipers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire were the REAL TRANSFORMERS during WWI:


More interesting helmets and armors can be found here: The Weirdest and Fiercest Helmets from the Age of Armored Combat
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grofjardanhazy:

r3druger:

I remember quite a few different designs from different countries.
Although it seems pretty silly now, it’s pretty cool to see just how far personal protection, body armor, and armor vehicles have come since the First World War.
The thought of rolling forward blindly Into machine gunfire is pretty is pretty horrifying.

Oh, French mobile personnel shields from WWI! Love this!

Similar ones were used by the Russians (here’s an example captured by some Germans):

And the Detroit police had similar mobile armors against riot crowds and barricaded gunmen in the late 1950s:

But snipers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire were the REAL TRANSFORMERS during WWI:

More interesting helmets and armors can be found here: The Weirdest and Fiercest Helmets from the Age of Armored Combat

(via / via / via)

(via historyinpictures)

fashionsfromhistory:

Jacket

1610-1615; Altered 1620

This fine early 17th-century woman’s waistcoat is particularly significant because it is shown being worn in the Portrait of Margaret Layton (museum no. E.214-1994), attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (1561-1636) and displayed alongside it. Waistcoats were long-sleeved upper garments, opening down the front and fitted at the waist using inserted gores. They were often made of linen and splendidly decorated as in this example.

Although the waistcoat was made about 1610, the portrait was painted more than 10 years later. By this time, waistlines had risen. Margaret Layton adapted to the new style by raising her petticoat and covering the lower half of the waistcoat.

V&A

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ororchideenoire:

Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

ororchideenoire:

Formalized Music / Thought and Mathematics in Composition, Iannis Xenakis (1971).

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zerostatereflex:

saVer-animaciones

Objects ground out of existence.

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natgeofound:

Portrait of a daughter of Danaus acting in “The Suppliant Maidens” on Mount Parnassus in Greece, December 1930.Photograph by Maynard Owen Williams, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

Portrait of a daughter of Danaus acting in “The Suppliant Maidens” on Mount Parnassus in Greece, December 1930.Photograph by Maynard Owen Williams, National Geographic Creative

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saisonciel:

Helene Denizon by Nickolas Muray, 1920s

saisonciel:

Helene Denizon by Nickolas Muray, 1920s

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art-centric:

Portrait of Phyllis Sjöström, 1914 Akseli Gallen-Kallela

art-centric:

Portrait of Phyllis Sjöström, 1914
Akseli Gallen-Kallela

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octaviasarms:

Jeanne Moreau and Monica Vitti in La Notte.

octaviasarms:

Jeanne Moreau and Monica Vitti in La Notte.

(via mudwerks)

magictransistor:

British Post Office engineers inspect Guglielmo Marconi’s wireless telegraphy (radio) equipment during demonstrations on on Flat Holm island, 13 May, 1897.

magictransistor:

British Post Office engineers inspect Guglielmo Marconi’s wireless telegraphy (radio) equipment during demonstrations on on Flat Holm island, 13 May, 1897.

(via mudwerks)

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

(via mudwerks)

(via mudwerks)